How much have you saved?

Captain P is my Habitat user name. I have 3268 Habitat points which places me in 45th position on the leader board. A couple of weeks back I received an email from 7 year old Madeline telling me she loved the game and she was top of the leader board with over 5000 points.

I can’t see Madeline from my position but I am sure she has racked up many more points by now.

When players sign in we are all asked to sign onto the honour system by ticking a box that says we promise to tell the truth about our real world missions. So there is no way for us to verify if players are lying about what they have done in the real world but I am able to tell you about what I have achieved in the month I have been playing. I have tried to be as accurate about my behaviours as possible and according to my profile I have saved:

–       240 buckets of water,
–       103.8 feet of land, and
–       5181 balloons of carbon.

The calculations of my real world behaviours

So what does this mean? It is the team at Integrated Sustainable Analysis at Sydney University who have up with the algorithms and our measurement tools.

The number of buckets represents the litres of water based on an averaged sized 10 litre bucket or 2.64 gallons.

Buckets of water represent the number of litres of water you have saved

Buckets of water represent the number of litres of water you have saved

The number of footprints represents the area of land that a player has NOT disturbed by their actions. The measurement is based on a typical human footprint area of 300 cm2 or 47 square-inches.

Represents the area of land you have NOT disturbed

The number of balloons represents the volume of greenhouse gas emissions measured in terms of volume of C02 gas, 1 kg or 2.2 pounds.

The number of balloons represents the volume of greenhouse gas emmissions

Remember all of these actions are based around rewarding players when they are under the national average.

So if we add all of my measurements up I have saved:

–       2,400 Litres of water or 576 Gallons of water
–       31,140 cm2 or 4,878.6 square inches of land
–       5181 kg or 11,398.2 pounds of carbon

I could keep calculating to tell you that each gallon of gas you put in a car produces 14 pounds of carbon dioxide. My behaviours equate to about the equivalent savings of over 800 gallons of gas.

Although we can never verify the actions of our players, right now we have a couple of thousand kids playing and collectively they have saved:

Community Saved Water Buckets: 32703.48

Community Saved Soccer Fields: 882965.09

Community Saved Light bulbs: 2935397.98

And who said kids can’t make a difference? It is going to take top down and bottom up approaches to address global issues like climate change and we need our kids to know they can be part of the solution.

We are keen to know what you have saved and what that equates to. Please share your profile with us on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/habitatthegame

To learn more about how Sydney University came to calculate these savings go to our previous blog post:

https://habitatthegame.wordpress.com/2014/03/22/incentivising-players-to-reduce-their-footprint-by-25-below-the-national-average/

 

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About habitatthegame

The world’s habitats are in danger and you can help save them. In the vein of the Tamagotchi persistence play craze of the 90s, users will undertake actions to keep an endangered animal alive. In Habitat game players will adopt a polar bear. To keep the bear alive and healthy, players need to successfully complete events in the game and undertake real world actions. By completing these TASKS players will progress through levels, increasing the health of their bear and earn badges of recognition for their efforts. Ultimately the goal is to save the world by improving the bear’s health.

Posted on June 27, 2014, in Algorithms, Curriculum, Sydney University and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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