Category Archives: Curriculum

New Pin Locations

Here is a table that shows the countries where our 149 pins are currently located.

We are continuing to add locations.

The aim is to create a local/global experience. Kids learn about the species, plants and areas that are local to them and trade their pins with other kids globally.

Habitat the Game at Conservation Week

It’s easy to add more pins so reach out to us on Facebook , Instagram or Twitter and let us know where you would like to explore. Create a Habitat pin scavenger hunt in your neighbourhood!

Pin  Countries
Highland Cow Scotland
Golden Eagle Scotland
Red Squirrel Scotland
Red Deer Stags Scotland
Scottish Wildcat Scotland
Nessie Scotland
Capercaille Scotland
Pine Marten Scotland
Osprey Scotland
The Cobbler Scotland
Tian Tian Scotland
Gannet Scotland
Hen Harrier Scotland
Northern Lights Scotland
Stone of Destiny Scotland
White-Tailed Sea Eagle Scotland
Standing Stones Circle Scotland
Thistle Scotland
Grey Seal Scotland
Otter Scotland
Shetland Pony Scotland
Kangaroo Paw Australia
Black Swan Australia
Dolphins Australia
Quokka Australia
Grass tree Australia
Whale Shark Australia
Numbat Australia
Western Grey Kangaroo Australia
Western Blue-tongue Skinks Australia
Thylacoleo Australia
Gurrabal Australia
Clown Fish Australia, Malaysia, Japan, Papua New Guniea, Solomon Islands
Red Kangaroo Australia
Fallow Deer England, Ireland, Iceland
Black Cockatoo Australia
Bald Eagle USA, Canada
Manta Ray USA, Hawaii, Australia, South Africa, Japan
Saltwater croc Australia, India, Thailand, Malaysia, Cambodia
Brown Bear USA, Canada, Russia, China, Sweden, Finland, Norway
Bison USA
California Sea Lion USA, Mexico
Dolphins Australia, USA, Mexico, Guatemala
Tundra, Polar Bear USA
Sasha, Amur Tiger USA
Indy, California Sea Lion USA
Betty, Grizzly Bear USA
Houdini, King Cobra USA
Dexter, Magellanic Penguin USA
Cortez, Red-Ruffed Lemur USA
Opal, Silvered Leaf Monkey USA
Tuti, Western Lowland Gorilla USA
Kenya, White-Throated Bee-eater USA
Leo, Baby Snow Leopard USA
Jalak, Bali Mynah USA
Charlie, California Sea Lion USA
Dash, Gentoo Penguin USA
Diver, Scaly-Sided Merganser USA
Zoe, Snow Leopard USA
Biru, Red Panda USA
Sid, Babydool Sheep USA
Dori, California Sea Lion USA
Anura, Dart Poison Frog USA
Binda, Dingo USA
Drummer, Emu USA
Kobo, Hamadryas Baboon USA
Dakota, American Bison USA
Spangles, Andean Bear USA
Mable, Hyacinth Macaw USA
Mags, Pronghorn USA
Cleo, Puma USA
Duke, California Sea Lion USA
Nuka, Pacific Walrus USA
Jacob, Sea Otter USA
Ocellated Turkey Guatemala
King Vulture Venezuela
Kapok Tree Brazil
Tapir Brazil
Jaguar Guatemala
Leafcutter Ant Costa Rica
Giant anteater Honduras
Black howler monkey Belize
Red-Eyed tree frog Nicaragua
Amazon River dolphin Brazil
Green Anaconda Venezuela
African Elephant Kenya
Scarlet Macaw Mexico
Monarch butterfly Mexico
Ruby-throated hummingbird Peru
Blue Morpho Butterfly Costa Rica
Cacao Tree Ecuador
Banana Honduras
Tea plant China
Pineapple Brazil
Flying fox Australia
Rainbow lorikeet Australia
Koala Australia
Humpback whale Australia
Crayfish New Zealand
Silver Fern New Zealand
White Kiwi New Zealand
Hihi New Zealand
Tuatara New Zealand
NZ Fur Seal New Zealand
Octopus New Zealand
Blue Cod New Zealand
Starfish New Zealand
Little Blue Penguin New Zealand
Sasa, Sun Bear New Zealand
Black Oyster Catcher New Zealand
Brown Kiwi New Zealand
Long Finned Eel New Zealand
Kaka New Zealand
Kereu New Zealand
Beaver Mannahatta USA
Bald Eagle USA
Black Bear USA
Puma USA
River Otter USA
Kiani, Orangutan Australia
People’s Climate March USA
People’s Climate March USA
Tasmanian Devil Australia
Giant Panda China, Hong Kong
Polar Bear USA, Canada, Russia, Greenland, Norway
Amur tiger Russia, Korea,  China
King Cobra India, China, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam
Magellanic penguin Brazil, Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands
Red Ruffed Lemur Madagascar
Silvered Leaf Monkey Malaysia and Borneo
Western lowland gorilla  Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo
White-throated bee-eater Senegal and Uganda
Baby Snow leopard Nepal, India, China, Russia, Pakistan
Bali mynah Indonesia
Gentoo Penguin Falkland Islands, Argentina, Chile, New Zealand
Scaly-Sided Merganser South Korea, China, Japan, Vietnam, Thailand, Russia
Snow Leopard Nepal, India, China, Russia, Pakistan
Red Panda Bhutan, China, Myanma, India, Tibet
Poison Dart Frog Bolivia, Costa Rica, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Venezuela, Peru, Panama and Hawaii
Dingo Australia
Emu Australia
Hamadryas baboon Jordan,Yemen and Saudi Arabia, Eritrea to Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia
Andean Bear Panama, Venezuela,Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Argentina
Hyacinth Macaw  Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay
Pronghorn USA, Canada, Mexico
Puma Canada, USA, Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Chile
Pacific Walrus USA, Canada, Greenland, Russia
Sea Otter USA, Canada, Japan, Russia, Mexico
Sun Bear India, Thailand, Bangladesh, Malaysia, Laos, China

Habitat launches curriculum materials

We have just launched our Sustainability Learning Guide, it is based on Habitat the Game, and has been designed to engage and inspire students, teachers and the wider community to play Habitat and take personal and community actions on sustainability. This guide is a dynamic and interactive resource that can be used to extend sustainability actions beyond time in the classroom and while looking at screens.

It has been created for years 3,4,5 and 6.

The methodology used to develop the Guide included collaboration from a wide range of stakeholders including teachers, students and environmental educators from Australia. It links to the National Australian Curriculum. Many of these activities have been inspired by existing materials created by the BBC, NatGeo, The Coal Loader Sustainability Guide and NASA.

Sustainability is one of the core curriculums in the National Australian Curriculum. Download the link here:
http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/crosscurriculumpriorities/sustainability

Habitat Unit plans

This guide can be used as a 10 week unit or individual plans. When using the individual plans it is valuable to download the whole learning guide below.

Habitat the Game Learning Guide – offers a full Version of the guide that includes all of the Lesson Plans.

You can see the individual unit plans on our main website at:

http://www.habitatthegame.com/teachers/curriculum-materials/

Let’s evaluate the game

Can a game change behaviour?

We are looking for teachers to help us collect some data

We would like you to help us answer a couple of questions:

Does the game Habitat increase the practice of environmentally friendly behaviors by players of the game?

Does the game Habitat encourage children to spend more times outdoors?

Calling all teachers!

Calling all teachers!

If you are interested in joining the study please contact me at
kylee (at) habitatthegame.com

I look forward to hearing form you. Base line data collection is fun!

With thanks,

Kylee

How much have you saved?

Captain P is my Habitat user name. I have 3268 Habitat points which places me in 45th position on the leader board. A couple of weeks back I received an email from 7 year old Madeline telling me she loved the game and she was top of the leader board with over 5000 points.

I can’t see Madeline from my position but I am sure she has racked up many more points by now.

When players sign in we are all asked to sign onto the honour system by ticking a box that says we promise to tell the truth about our real world missions. So there is no way for us to verify if players are lying about what they have done in the real world but I am able to tell you about what I have achieved in the month I have been playing. I have tried to be as accurate about my behaviours as possible and according to my profile I have saved:

–       240 buckets of water,
–       103.8 feet of land, and
–       5181 balloons of carbon.

The calculations of my real world behaviours

So what does this mean? It is the team at Integrated Sustainable Analysis at Sydney University who have up with the algorithms and our measurement tools.

The number of buckets represents the litres of water based on an averaged sized 10 litre bucket or 2.64 gallons.

Buckets of water represent the number of litres of water you have saved

Buckets of water represent the number of litres of water you have saved

The number of footprints represents the area of land that a player has NOT disturbed by their actions. The measurement is based on a typical human footprint area of 300 cm2 or 47 square-inches.

Represents the area of land you have NOT disturbed

The number of balloons represents the volume of greenhouse gas emissions measured in terms of volume of C02 gas, 1 kg or 2.2 pounds.

The number of balloons represents the volume of greenhouse gas emmissions

Remember all of these actions are based around rewarding players when they are under the national average.

So if we add all of my measurements up I have saved:

–       2,400 Litres of water or 576 Gallons of water
–       31,140 cm2 or 4,878.6 square inches of land
–       5181 kg or 11,398.2 pounds of carbon

I could keep calculating to tell you that each gallon of gas you put in a car produces 14 pounds of carbon dioxide. My behaviours equate to about the equivalent savings of over 800 gallons of gas.

Although we can never verify the actions of our players, right now we have a couple of thousand kids playing and collectively they have saved:

Community Saved Water Buckets: 32703.48

Community Saved Soccer Fields: 882965.09

Community Saved Light bulbs: 2935397.98

And who said kids can’t make a difference? It is going to take top down and bottom up approaches to address global issues like climate change and we need our kids to know they can be part of the solution.

We are keen to know what you have saved and what that equates to. Please share your profile with us on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/habitatthegame

To learn more about how Sydney University came to calculate these savings go to our previous blog post:

https://habitatthegame.wordpress.com/2014/03/22/incentivising-players-to-reduce-their-footprint-by-25-below-the-national-average/

 

Letter to Teachers – Habitat and school curriculum

Sometimes the best way to learn about our earth and the species which inhabit this planet is by experiencing it. While HABITAT is essentially a game, it is more importantly a dynamic learning tool with real implications. A game where schools, classes, teachers and individual students and their families can actively participate in exploring, discovering, learning, acting and bringing about positive environmental change.

HABITAT is attuned to the Australian Science Curriculum for students in years K-6 and thereby asks questions about the world in which we live. It nurtures curiosity, offers inquiry problem solving situations and develops a solid foundation of knowledge that students can apply to real life – in particular their own life.

 

Sustainability is an embedded theme in HABITAT and therefore is relevant to all K-6 learning levels. It provides the platform to ascertain our collective and individual impact on the earth’s sustainability. Importantly HABITAT is a comprehensive educational resource that engenders active and environmentally responsible global citizens while being engaging and fun.

Specifically HABITAT is relevant to the Australian Science Curriculum in the following topics:

‘Years K–2 (typically from 5 to 8 years of age)

Curriculum focus: awareness of self and the local world

Unifying ideas:

  • Exploration
  • Observation
  • Order
  • Change
  • Questioning and speculation

Years 3–6 (typically from 8 to 12 years of age)

Curriculum focus: recognising questions that can be investigated scientifically and investigating them.

Building on the unifying ideas of exploration, observation, order, change, questioning and speculation, the unifying ideas of this age range are:

  • Patterns
  • Systems
  • Relationships
  • Evidence and explanations’

Draft Consultation version 1.1.0 Australian Curriculum

ACARA Australian Curriculum Consultation Portal 14/07/2010 6

Classroom syllabus topics relevant to the curriculum can be applied to the learning of:

  • Threatened species
  • Endangered species
  • Animal physical characteristics
  • Diet and food consumption
  • Behaviour
  • Breeding and population
  • Habitats and needs
  • Geographical regions
  • Environment protection
  • Conservation
  • Sustainability

Authour:

Anne Chesher
Quadrant Productions
Media+Education