Blog Archives

Habitat the Game Player Tutorials

We have finished 7 short videos that explain Habitat the Game.

An Introduction:

How to Care for your Bear:

How to feed your Bear:

Real World Actions:

Glacier Park:

Your Profile

How to Trade Pins

 

You can see these videos and more on our youtube channel at :Habitat the Game on YouTube

 

 

Can technology get kids outdoors?

We are hoping to talk at SXSW about how technology can get kids outdoors.

If you have 2 minutes you can vote for our project below.
 
Vote to see my session at SXSW 2015!

Habitat the Game video tutorials

There are so many aspects to Habitat the Game – real world actions, bear care, glacier park, player profiles, mini games and more.

A number of players have asked us “how to” so we have begun to film a series of player tutorials with the game’s creator Kylee Ingram.

They will be available on our YouTube channel.

Check out the first video, all you need to know about Bear Care:

How to trade pins

How to trade pins. This is the article we posted on the help section of the game for kids. We have included here for parents with pictures of the screens.

Become a global trader!

We are keen to see Habitat players head outside and explore the world.

We will reward you for going outside and finding Habitat locations.

There are currently over 100 Habitat pins in 13 different countries around the world; to find the virtual pins make sure you turn on the location services and sign in.

 

Image

Habitat the game virtual pin

When you are near a Habitat location you will be notified about the location and which unique virtual pin you will find.

There are a number of ways you can search for pins:

–       Use the map to see the pins around you and around the world,

–       By country; will show you what pins are available in each country,

–       By Pin; type in the name of the pin you would like to find.

 

Habitat the game virtual pin board

How to search for virtual pins

At each Habitat location there is a unique virtual pin you can collect.  These pins can be traded at a later date.

 When you are close enough to the pin, tap on the pin to collect. The pin is instantly added to your Pin Gallery.

 

Collect your virtual pin

Habitat virtual pin collection

For additional Habitat points answer the multiple-choice questions on the reverse side of the pin.

Collecting more than one pin

You can collect up to three of each pin at any one time. Although you do have to wait 30 minutes after collecting your first pin before you can receive your second pin at that location.

You Pin Gallery will show which pins you own, how many of each pin you have and what pins you have up for trading.

 

Habitat virtual pin gallery

Habitat’s virtual pin gallery

Trading

 Once you have collected a pin it automatically goes into your trading list, ie the trading icon is on. You can turn off the trading icon by simply tapping it when your pin is full screen.

 

If another player puts one of your pins on their wish list you will be notified they would like to make a trade. You will be able to see what pin/pins they will offer in return for you pin.

You then have three choices:

–       accept their offer,

–       reject their offer or

–       ask them to make another offer.

Trades between two players will stay open for an hour and you can trade up with 5 different players at a time.

Any pins you would like to add to your gallery can be added by tapping them on your wish list. You can find pins to add to your wish list by doing either a search by country or by pin name.

 There are currently 102 pins you can collect. They are located in the following countries:

 USA
Guatemala
Venezuela
Brazil
Costa Rica
Honduras
Belize
Nicaragua
Kenya
Mexico
Peru
Australia
Scotland
New Zealand

You will need to work with other players around the world to get the full set of pins.

For more information on pins you can find us on instagram at habitatthegame or twitter @habitatthegame 

Testing Habitat’s Virtual Pins

On Manhattan’s upper west side, a group of young players tested Habitat’s new location services.

They went hunting for pins…..

Ten virtual pins were placed along the Eastside Parkway.

Players navigate to the location using a gps enabled map.

Players can then trade their pins with other players around the world.

Below is a video of the day:

 

TEST DAY! Habitat the Game

The team at the Centre for Research on Computer Supported Learning and Cognition (CoCo) at Sydney University hosted our Habitat testing day in their fantastic design studio.

We had 18 players participate. They were aged between 7 and 12 years.

Habitat's official day of testing

Habitat’s official day of testing

We did not give them any direction we just let them start playing the game and we listened to what they had to say.

They ended up playing for 90 minutes, which exceed our expectations.

The baby bear was a massive hit.

We interviewed the players after they played. Their feedback is an integral part to the next phase of our production. Thank you to all who participated.

Habitat Testing Day

Our latest location pins

Check out example of the pins our Habitat players will be collecting from across the globe.

Habitat the Game pins can be collected from across the globe

Habitat the Game pins can be collected from across the globe

Habitat video for MIPTV in Cannes.

In 2010 Habitat was nominated in Content 360 at MIPTV in Cannes. It seems so long ago!

This was the video we made with the formidable Lisa Gray at The Feds. Sebastian Gray is the talented youngster in the video.

Testing on Habitat the Game has begun

We have officially started testing with Habitat the game.

If you know any potential players aged between 7-12 please let us know and we will send you the game.

What we need is feedback.

Environmental Impact Accounting from the team at Integrated Sustainability Analysis (ISA).

We have been working with Dr Chris Dey and Jacob Fry. Below are some notes about how they have set up the figures behind the game.

“The game has the task of conveying ideas of both responsibility and empowerment to the player. Responsibility here means creating the link between lifestyle choices and consumption habits, and environmental impact. The consumption of goods and services in Australia create environmental (and social) impacts all over the world through complicated supply chains. Often the environmental impacts of production are hidden to the consumers of final goods and services which makes it difficult to conceptualise these impacts. The game encourages the players to accept some responsibility for these consequences, without overwhelming them. The assignment of responsibility is tempered by empowerment to alter these impacts through lifestyle and consumption choices. The game guides players through relatively simple changes that cumulatively reduce their environmental impact.

The game aims to reduce the total impact of the players while recognising the importance of relative or fractional change as well. All reductions in environmental footprint should be encouraged, however the effect of this reduction should be compared to the scale of the problem and not be in ignorance of the environmental footprint that remains.

Environmental impact of players will be measured against a number of indicators, including energy, water, greenhouse gas emissions and ecological footprint. These data will be collected from the players over time to establish their personal footprint. The players then complete real world tasks, or actions, to improve their footprint. For each action, the change in environmental impact will be calculated against the national average and combined to determine an overall footprint:

–       Water (ML)

–       Emissions/Energy (t-CO2e)

–       Land (ha)

Habitat points are an easy way of summarising the player’s progress in the game and allow them to communicate this progress with their peers. The ‘player profile’ will contain information about Habitat Points and the actual environmental indicators. These indicators could be presented in standard metrics, such as mega-litres (ML) or hectares (ha), as well as simplified metrics which may be easier for the players to understand – such as ‘swimming pools’ or ‘football fields’. The player profile could also contain the details of completed actions, this may also create peer pressure to ensure that these actions are actually completed or maintained.”