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Habitat the Game Walkthrough

The Game
This walkthrough was written in July 2014. The game will continually be updated so look for the latest walkthrough documents. 

The world’s habitats are in danger and you can help save them.

Habitat is a touch-based (phone and tablet) mobile-social game experience that combines traditional mobile-social mechanics with gamified real-world activities and imaginative play to engage kids between 7-12 years old to help protect the environment with their everyday actions.

In Habitat, the player will take care of polar bears living in Glacier Park — an arctic wildlife refuge. They’ll clean, feed, and play with the bears, maintaining the animals’ happiness, but more is needed to keep them and their park healthy. Special bear care items, park items and potentially a baby bear will become available as users earn Habitat points and eco tokens. Points and tokens are earned by completing real world missions and playing the minigames. Real world missions earn more Habitat points than the mini games. To earn maximum habitat points, real world missions prompt kids to complete activities in their homes in order to reduce their ecological footprint.

A leaderboard system will keep track of Habitat points the player earns by caring for their bears and completing real world missions. When the game starts, players will be able to view their progress relative to their friends (see privacy and security section) and the global game.


 Walkthrough

Login

After you have rubbed the bear at the  start of the game the game goes to a screen where you will fill in.

Your Bear Name
A User Name
A Password

Habitat the Game login

Habitat the Game logi

01 Home screen

The home screen has the bear front and centre.

The three icons above the bear represent the three areas of bear health. Players need to keep these in balance to keep the bear healthy. The bear has a number of different levels of health. Like a tamagochi the aim is to take care of the bear in a persistence play model. If the bear is not cared for it sails off.

1. The fish is the way you feed the bear,
2. The heart is how you “love your bear, and
3. The paw is where you do your real world actions.

A player presses these icons to action the activities.

Players can also navigate through to Glacier Park, Rewards and their Profile.

Home Screen Habitat the Game

Home Screen Habitat the Game

02 Bear Care
When a player presses the heart icon they are able to interact with their bear. They will chose to either love their bear by grooming, petting or feeding it from the options in the tray below. These interactions make the “heart” metre go up.

Kids have to do real world actions to gain the eco tokens needed to acquire more of the care icons in the tray at the bottom of the screen.

 

Bear Care Habitat the Game

Bear Care Habitat the Game

 03 Mini Game – Feeding
When a player presses the fish icon they go to a “Temple Run” Style game where the player tries to collect as many fish for the bear as they can.

Once they have finished the game the “fish” meter goes up.

Feeding Game Habitat the Game

Feeding Game Habitat the Game

04 Real World Play
Clicking on the paw icon takes you to the real world play which is the unique point of Habitat. Kids can chose to do fast (daily) or slow (weekly) missions.

Each of these missions are backed up by algorithms from Sydney University who are measuring the kid’s savings in terms of water, land and carbon saved. By completing real world missions the parks health remains high. If real world missions are not completed then the parks health falls into neglect. The parks health is visually reflected in the game.

 

Real World Missions

Real World Missions

 

Quick Missions

These quick missions are a mixture of quick actions ie turning off a light and answering quiz questions that are about their bear or about topics relating to their real world actions.

Weekly Missions

Players can do harder missions where they plot their behaviours across a week.
They will receive daily reminders to log their behaviour for the day.

If they complete one of these missions they level up and unlock a secret mini game.

 05 Profile Page

The players are able to see a number of things on their profile page:

  1. Their savings – how much they have saved in terms of water, land and energy
  2. A Leaderboard – players will be able to see where they stand in the overall rankings and amongst their friends.
  3. They are able to invite a friend to join the game.
  4. Players will also be able to see their Habitat points, eco tokens, bear health, park health and their bear photo album.
The calculations of my real world behaviours

The calculations of my real world behaviours

 

 06 Rewards

Players head to the rewards page which acts as a shop where they can spend their eco tokens.

They can add items to love, groom and feed their bear in the bear care screen. They can also buy power ups to help them in the feeding mini game, such as a magnet to attract more fish.

 

 

07 Glacier Park
Players can see a wider shot of where their bear is in glacier park. They can also see a couple of other bears roaming around.

Players earn achievements items each time they level up and can add these as structures in their glacier park. By placing an item in the park they are rewarded with an animation of their bear interacting with the achievement item. Achievement items include a slide, swing, hot tub, deck chair and a castle.

Players are trying to make their bear grow and they will get a baby bear once they have levelled up enough times. See below.

Hidden Rewards

  1. Completing a weekly real world mission

After players continue a real world mission for a week, they wil be taken to a bonus mini game where the bear runs across the top of the ice.

Bonus Game

Bonus Game

 

  1. Level 7

When kids get to Level 7 they receive a baby bear. They grow this bear with its parent until the parent leaves the screen heading to the family photo album and the baby bear grows up and becomes your main player.

 

To activate the bears “breeding” the player needs to go to glacier park and click on their bear with the hearts over it. The two bears then “date” and a sequence of images show them playing together, living together and ends with the presentation of their baby bear.

Baby Bear Habitat the Game

Baby Bear Habitat the Game

 08 Trading Pins

 There are currently over 150 Habitat pins in 13 different countries around the world; to find the virtual pins make sure you turn on the location services and sign in.

When you are near a Habitat location you will be notified about the location and which unique virtual pin you will find.

There are a number of ways you can search for pins:

–        Use the map to see the pins around you and around the world,
–        By country; will show you what pins are available in each country,
–        By Pin; type in the name of the pin you would like to find.

 

Habitat the Game pin trading

Habitat the Game pin trading

At each Habitat location there is a unique virtual pin you can collect. These pins can be traded at a later date.

WA Tourism's Whale Shark

WA Tourism’s Whale Shark

When you are close enough to the pin, tap on the pin to collect. The pin is instantly added to your Pin Gallery.

Virtual Pin - Sea Lion

Virtual Pin – Sea Lion

IMG_1887

For additional Habitat points answer the multiple-choice questions on the reverse side of the pin.

 

Collecting more than one pin

 

You can collect up to three of each pin at any one time. Although you do have to wait 30 minutes after collecting your first pin before you can receive your second pin at that location.

You Pin Gallery will show which pins you own, how many of each pin you have and what pins you have up for trading.

Trading

Once you have collected a pin it automatically goes into your trading list, ie the trading icon is on. You can turn off the trading icon by simply tapping it when your pin is full screen.

To trade with someone press the trade pins button

Trade Virtual Pins

 

If another player puts one of your pins on their wish list you will be notified they would like to make a trade. You will be able to see what pin/pins they will offer in return for you pin.

 

You then have three choices:

–        accept their offer,

–        reject their offer or

–        ask them to make another offer.

Trades between two players will stay open for an hour.

Habitat the Game pins can be collected from across the globe

Habitat the Game pins can be collected from across the globe

Any pins you would like to add to your gallery can be added by tapping them on your wish list. You can find pins to add to your wish list by doing either a search by country or by pin name.

There are currently 150 pins you can collect. They are located in the following countries:

USA
Guatemala
Venezuela
Brazil
Costa Rica
Honduras
Belize
Nicaragua
Kenya
Mexico
Peru
Australia
Scotland
New Zealand

You will need to work with other players around the world to get the full set of pins.

Habitat Behaviours Uncovered

We have quizzed kids aged 7-12 about what environmental behaviours they recognise and can undertake. Their answers have given us a list of actions that kids will earn points for in the game and in turn we are able to tell them (thanks to Sydney University’s team at Institute of Sustainable Analysis – ISA) how much water, land and carbon they have saved.

Habitat's Real World Actions

Real World Actions

 

 

 

 

 

Here we look at Super Scrub which asks players to reduce the length of their shower.

Super Scrub behaviour

Real World action Super Scrub

Each action is accompanies by an explanation. With Super Scrub the player learns why they should try and limit their showers i.e “limiting your shower to 4-minutes means that you only use about 80L of water for your shower, and that means we don’t have to put as much stress on our water ways and environment to meet our water needs!”

Explanation Real World Action

In order to earn points the player inputs how many minutes they spent in the shower. They are rewarded for every minute they save under the national average (ie 4 minutes) with an average water flow of 15 litres per minute. They are also able to tick a box confirming they took a shower instead of a bath, which gives them an automatic saving of 120 litres.

Habitat players are rewarded for real world behaviours

The environmental savings in Super Scrub are then calculated as savings relative to the national average and in this in this behaviour the player is saving both water and carbon (energy expended from heating the water) 

The team at the ISA have worked out calculations for every one of the behaviours in Habitat the game. If you would like to know more about any of the action send us an email at parents at habitatthegame dot com

How Habitat is committed to protecting your children

Our team at Habitat takes maintaining the privacy of your children very seriously. Below we explain the measures we have taken to keep your child’s identity private while playing Habitat.

In Habitat the Game players adopt a virtual animal, play mini games and do tasks in the real world to keep the animal alive.

GameScreenExample_iPhone01a[1]

We will never know the identity of our players as we do not collect any personal information about your children when they login, but we do keep track of what they are doing in the game so they can earn rewards for their real world actions.

What makes Habitat different from most other games is that we are integrating player’s real world actions into the game. In order to keep these scores players will be asked to answer questions about their ecological footprint and their real life behaviours. These results will be put into their own eco calculators to show how much water, land and carbon the players have saved.

We have also added location services to the game so players are rewarded when they find locations in the real world. This means the player will be notified then they are close to a Habitat location. We will know how many players visited certain locations and how many pins they traded (this information will never be supplied in real time). The pins have all been placed in areas that are trafficked by family groups.

Once players collect these digital pins they will then be able to trade these pins with other player around the world. This is a closed game system where players will only see one another’s usernames and pin collection.

In order to connect with their friends we have provided players with the ability to have limited and controlled communications (they share codes between one another to gain access) such as seeing one another’s animals and sharing scores. On the leaderboard players will be able to view their progress relative to their friends. They will be able to identify one another through their usernames.

We have a very simple log in system where players put in a name for their animal. In order to keep track of their real world actions and the pins they collected we ask players to sign in with a user name and a unique password. They need to remember the name and password, as we are not collecting emails or any other personal information. We also ask them a security question so we can help them remember the password if they need to.

The login system was established so the players never lose their real world scores or pins, which we believe would ruin the game play experience for children that have worked hard to build their profiles.

We have designed Habitat to be a game that encourages kids to seek answers from their parents. They may need your help to answer some of the real world questions.

We have more information for parents on our website:
http://www.habitatthegame.com/parents/

We have set up a blog with the latest news
https://habitatthegame.wordpress.com/

and facebook page https://www.facebook.com/habitatthegame  to communicate with parents

You can also email us: parents at habitatthegame dot com

Our privacy policy can be viewed at: http://www.habitatthegame.com/privacy-policy/

Here are some tips about how to keep your kids safe on line while playing Habitat and other online services.

–       Ensure your kids pick a username that is not able to identify them
–       Help them pick a good password
–       Tell them never to share their passwords
–       Only allow them to share friend codes with their friends
–       Teach your children to logout of computers when they have finished playing
–       Tell them not to open emails or messages from people they don’t know
–       Teach your children how to use social networks

Habitat adds locations to the game!!!

Habitat will reward kids for visiting locations.

The game’s creator Kylee Ingram says “This will be an important part of our real world rewards. Kids are going outdoors 70% less than they did two generations ago. We are going to reward them for getting out in the world and finding locations. They will receive a beautiful unique pin that they will be able to trade with other players from all over the world.”

Thanks to Habitat’s friends at the Wildlife Conservation Society and The Rainforest Alliance. There will be locations in 100 countries around the world when the game officially launches in March.

How location services will work?

When players near a Habitat location they will automatically notified on their device there is a location within 50 meters of their current location.

They will be told how many Habitat points they will earn if they find the location and which location pin they will receive.

When they find the location they automatically receive a pin. They can also earn Habitat points by completing a quiz about the animal or location they have found.  These pins can be traded with other Habitat players.

ImageExample Player Scenario:

Nine year old Jenny lives in Sydney. She is walking near the park under and she receives an alert that a Habitat location is near her.

“There is a Habitat location” 30 meters from your current location. Find the location and you will be rewarded 30 Habitat points and be given a unique BLACK COCKATOO pin.”

Jenny presses the start button on her phone and heads off to find the location.  The phone let’s her know when she has been successful.

“Congratulations you just earned the BLACK COCKATOO pin. By clicking on her pin Jenny learns some fun facts about the Black Cockatoo. She can also answer a quiz for additional Habitat points.

PIN SWAPPING
Two days later

Jenny passes the park again and picks up another BLACK COCKATOO pin. She has collected two so she can trade this pin with another kid in the world.

Jenny looks through the app and decides she would like an Iguana pin she will need to make the trade with another player in Costa Rica. The kids can only see one another’s user names. Jenny offers the other player her BLACK COCKATOO pin and the PENGUIN pin she located at the zoo.

Jenny is asked three multiple choice questions about Iguanas before the transfer occurs. Jenny then goes and checks out her pin page where she is rapidly building on the number of pins she has.

Meet our music composer – Gary Sinclair

What is your role on Habitat?Image
Sound design and music composition

Tell us a little about your background?
Music production/supervision and audio post for all media. At the moment my back ground, like..behind me? there are lots of people making a polar bear do strange things on computers.

What aspects of Habitat are you most excited about?
an intuitive all encompassing feel god fun experience. and helping to create a lovely world to explore and maintain. Also to encourage positive behaviours too

What are some of the challenges that the team has been facing?
creating the emotional sounds of a polar bear.

What are some of the music references you are using for the game?
music references are anything from archived inuit recordings to animals call/response communication systems int heir natural environment. Also current games such as the Journey and Flow. The Mogwai soundtrack for Les Revenants

What kind of feelings/thoughts do you hope the music will evoke?
i only hope that the music and sound helps to creative an overall experience, The emotions of the bear and the game will be determined by the player and how they play the game, i hope the music will reflect this.

What future do you see for Habitat?
cold and icy hopefully, that’s the way the bear likes it

Can kids make a difference?

The making of this game has been an interesting journey. We looked at many options when raising money including government agencies, sponsors, educational entities and broadcasters.

One of the hurdles we hit surprised us. We were asked; Should you be making a game that suggests to kids that they can have an influence on climate change?

One institution said “we have to ask if a game proposing individual action on a problem that can only productively be addressed at the policy level is useful.” While a broadcasters said “the major issue for us is the link (or implied link) between actions in the real world and climate change.” They did not want kids to think they could make a difference on the animal’s habitat they were caring for.

We have always been very clear about why we are making this game and our reasons have not changed.

We want to create a game that is incredibly fun to play but at the same time empower kids and give them information that will make them more resilient and enabling to join the debate.

We know that kids feel incredibly disempowered when it comes to environmental problems and climate change. We are focusing on the individual behaviours that they do feel in control of. They will be able to see how much they can achieve if they work together as a community.

Public support is one of the crucial components needed for policy change and we are aiming to help kids understand basic principles.

Finally we asked Dr Chris Dey at Sydney University did he think Kids could make a difference?

The person behind the concept

We caught up with Habitat’s Producer Kylee Ingram:

Habitat's creator Kylee Ingram

Habitat’s creator Kylee Ingram

How did you come up with the idea for Habitat?

A few years ago ABC TV had a serious game competition. One of our production managers at the time told me about it, we had missed the deadline but the concept left my mind buzzing. The next night I woke up in the middle of the night and wrote up the concept  – adopt a digital pet that is endangered by climate change and change your own behaviours to keep him alive. I pitched it to my colleagues the next day, they loved it and everyone gave us their thoughts. I then submitted it to Content 360 at Cannes and it was nominated as one of best new ideas. We knew we were onto something.

Tell us a little about your background?

I traditionally come from a TV and documentary background. I started out in sports television but I left wanting to create media that was more outcomes focused. In  2003 I started Australian Documentaries to produce stories for the NGO and government sectors communicating social and environmental issues.

What did you find appealing about the Habitat project?

I love the real world cross over. I think that is going to be a dynamic that people explore more and more. I love that we will be creating a game that will empower kids. We have found kids feel disillusioned and worried about environmental problems. We are giving them information and action that they can do to make a difference. Kids will be able to see as individuals and as a collective how much they are saving in terms of energy, water and land. We hope this will be really powerful.

What are some of the challenges that the team has been facing?

Budget is always an issue with these types of project as we are creating a hugely ambitious game. We would like it to be both fun AND educational. Including the real world actions into the game is hard.  We know foremost we need to create a sticky game that kids will want to keep on playing.

Tell us a little about the Team you are working in. They come from a range of backgrounds?

Our team is bringing together people with a diverse range of background from TV, animation, composing, gaming and more. Everyone is really passionate about the project and we have all had a great time working together in house which is new for all of us.

What future do you see for Habitat?

We want habitat to be the most effective environmental game ever launched.

In the second iteration we will have location based services added so kids will be notified when they are near a habitat location. We are inviting NGOs, museums and parks from all over the world to participate. The aim is to get kids playing Habitat in every corner of the earth.

 

Artists joining Habitat the Game

We have asked some of the world’s most well known contemporary artists to submit ideas for an artwork that Habitat Kids will be able to replicate.

These world-renowned artists have gained recognition for creating artworks from recycled and re-purposed materials. They are also great at finding ways to create artworks in the natural environment. We hope the kids will get a kick out of creating the artworks and it will inspire them to see the world through an artist’s lens.

Habitat the Game will reward the kids for replicating the artwork and posting their replications online.

Stay tuned we will announce who the artists are very soon.

If you have an artist you would like to recommend please let us know.

Meet the animators – An interview with Greg Hunsburger

We caught up with Greg Hunsburger who is the 3D Designer on Habitat:

IMG_6569

Tell us a little about your background?
I am 2D designer and 3D animator. I’ve designed and animated exhibition pieces for the Australian Museum and media for the Australian Maritime Museum among other fun and quirky projects. I am a nature enthusiast and natural born explorer.

What do you like about Habitat?
The Bear, the Park and the Heart of the project. It’s exciting to work on a game that puts an important message forward while making something really fun and engaging. The bears are ridiculously cute!

What kind of animation decisions have you been making?
I’ve been across the entirety of the project writing actions scripts and making sure the Bear’s character is really front and center. The decisions that I make are about making these Polar Bears lovable and where the animations all fit within a dynamic narrative. My hope is that Habitat the game is as much about meeting and getting to know the bears as much as playing games with them.

What have been some of the challenges for you?
Redesigning our work pipeline from 3D and 2D animation over to game building has been one kind of challenge. Making game play and reward decisions that stay true to the heart of our game while keeping it a fun experience has been a very cool and altogether new puzzle to solve.

What are elements of the game you have enjoyed building?
I’ve enjoyed designing and building the quirky Achievements and thinking about the way in which real world actions can be dynamically reflected in the game world and game play. When kids see our bear doing a belly flop after taking a trip down our crazy ice-slide they are going to go bananas. When they see the park ravaged by pollution and climate change they are really going to get poked in the feelers.

Tell us a little about the Team you are working in. They come from a range of backgrounds?
The team is full of passion and seems to boil over with ideas and solutions. The team is new to apps but Brian’s experience is helping us navigate the waters with a lot of confidence. We’re a funny, quirky bunch and we all collaborate really well. The heart and soul of the game is something we all believe in, so it’s been a project of passion from the start.

What future do you see for Habitat?
I see Habitat the game expanding into other earthly regions, exploring other animals; all the while making the link back to the player’s home and habits.

I see the brand bringing some really great tools that will help kids and parents understand their ecological footprints and how we can work together to get our planet out of this mess.

Letter to Teachers – Habitat and school curriculum

Sometimes the best way to learn about our earth and the species which inhabit this planet is by experiencing it. While HABITAT is essentially a game, it is more importantly a dynamic learning tool with real implications. A game where schools, classes, teachers and individual students and their families can actively participate in exploring, discovering, learning, acting and bringing about positive environmental change.

HABITAT is attuned to the Australian Science Curriculum for students in years K-6 and thereby asks questions about the world in which we live. It nurtures curiosity, offers inquiry problem solving situations and develops a solid foundation of knowledge that students can apply to real life – in particular their own life.

 

Sustainability is an embedded theme in HABITAT and therefore is relevant to all K-6 learning levels. It provides the platform to ascertain our collective and individual impact on the earth’s sustainability. Importantly HABITAT is a comprehensive educational resource that engenders active and environmentally responsible global citizens while being engaging and fun.

Specifically HABITAT is relevant to the Australian Science Curriculum in the following topics:

‘Years K–2 (typically from 5 to 8 years of age)

Curriculum focus: awareness of self and the local world

Unifying ideas:

  • Exploration
  • Observation
  • Order
  • Change
  • Questioning and speculation

Years 3–6 (typically from 8 to 12 years of age)

Curriculum focus: recognising questions that can be investigated scientifically and investigating them.

Building on the unifying ideas of exploration, observation, order, change, questioning and speculation, the unifying ideas of this age range are:

  • Patterns
  • Systems
  • Relationships
  • Evidence and explanations’

Draft Consultation version 1.1.0 Australian Curriculum

ACARA Australian Curriculum Consultation Portal 14/07/2010 6

Classroom syllabus topics relevant to the curriculum can be applied to the learning of:

  • Threatened species
  • Endangered species
  • Animal physical characteristics
  • Diet and food consumption
  • Behaviour
  • Breeding and population
  • Habitats and needs
  • Geographical regions
  • Environment protection
  • Conservation
  • Sustainability

Authour:

Anne Chesher
Quadrant Productions
Media+Education